Czech

On this page you will find information (scroll down) about:

  1. the Czech gaming market, particularly regulation/legality of online gaming
  2. the Czech language and the challenges of iGaming localisation.

Status and potential of the
Czech online gaming market

Games, games everywhere you turn... Czech Republic is viewed as one of the wealthiest of the post-Communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Since the early 90s, gambling in Czech Republic rapidly became a well-spread phenomenon. Slot machines, casinos, betting shops and horseracing tracks are scattered all over the country.

Recent studies showed that Czech Republic has one gambling machine for every 200 citizens. As a country of 10.1 million people, it ranks #2 in the world among countries with the most land based gaming operations per capita. (For example, in the small border town České Velenice there is one slot machine for every 13.5 townspeople).

Add to this heavy "silver medal" the fact that Czechs aren't exactly the busiest people on the planet (#13 in the world at time devote to leisure and personal care, with 14.98 hours per day) and you will figure out how fine gambling is doing in Czech Republic.

...the Finance Ministry has announced that it is willing to allow foreign gambling companies access to Czech market. The new law is expected to enter into force in the early quarter of 2016.

Unsurprisingly, with the growth of the internet and developments in technology, Czech Republic has seen increased interest in all types of online gambling. And this obviously brought the public need for clear regulations for the industry. In 2012, the Czech government approved a new gambling law to replace the outdated Lotteries Act, but the new approach has been widely criticized by operators and was subsequently found to contradict the EU’s gambling directives. (It is reported that in the same year Czechs put nearly 5 billion € into bets, lotteries and slots).

In early 2013, extensive online gambling regulations were still a governmental promise to come. It was after the European Commission's intervention late that year that a new gambling legislation was drafted. In the autumn of 2014, the Finance Ministry has announced that it is willing to allow foreign gambling companies access to Czech market. The new law is expected to enter into force in the early quarter of 2016.

Are you in need of translating/localising your iGaming content into Czech? Why wait? Get in contact today! At All-In, a professional team of young translators, editors and proofreaders is ready to make your business speak to your Czech customers.

Challenges of Czech
gaming localisation

With interest in online gambling, and poker in particular, continually growing, the localization into Czech has brought interesting new challenges in recent years. Given the traditional card game terminology doesn’t quite fit poker (and sounds obsolete anyway, terms such as “list” or “štych” come to mind), Czech poker and casino players mostly prefer to adopt the English terms – with a Czech twist to them.

This means that “cash games” become “cashovky” or even “kešovky” or a “hand” becomes “henda” among players. These “czenglish” colloquialisms would therefore sound very familiar to players, but do not constitute correct Czech in any way. The trick is to strike the right balance between the two, so that the players feel at home and the language isn’t distorted any more than necessary.

Casino translation offers similar challenges, but here the options of “striking a balance” are limited – terms such as “Wild” or “Scatter” defy a seamless translation, which tends to be either too descriptive (“nahrazující symbol” for Wild) or borrow a term needed elsewhere (“žolík” for the same, meaning “joker”). These are then best left in English, as players are familiar with them anyway.

With classic casino games, such as roulette or Blackjack, English terms even add to the exotic and luxurious atmosphere. Of course, this isn’t always possible, such as when many “gamble” features distinguish between “suit” and “colour” (of the deck), which Czech simply doesn’t (suit = colour). So one always have to be on the lookout for terms being used by players...

And then there are other problems. They may not be necessarily limited to online gaming – any website translation has to deal with those. The best example is probably the formal/informal way of address. While the informal one could be perhaps used for emails and promotional offers, it would look very strange when filling in a deposit form.

While the informal one could be perhaps used for emails and promotional offers, it would look very strange when filling in a deposit form.

While it might help to create a friendly atmosphere with some users, it might be considered as impolite and intrusive by others. While you probably could distinguish different areas for different ways of address, the inconsistency would be confusing...

Generally speaking, the Czechs like their websites in their language. Users might be able to navigate within a software, as the terms for “raise” or “spin” may be recognized, but when it comes to promotional offers, rules of a tournament or wagering requirements (the words “wager”, “eligible” or “opt-in” causing constant troubles) a good translation can go a long way.

Contact us to find out how we can help translate and localize your gaming texts into Czech.

Czech infographic
Some general notes about the data:
These infographics were made in May 2014, and the data used is as recent as we could find. We have tried to find sources with data for all or many countries, in order to increase the value of comparison, but obviously this is not always possible. We encourage users to check the sources below or to contact us for clarification.
Internet penetration: www.internetlivestats.com
Credit cards per person: www.creditcards.com
Smartphone penetration: think.withgoogle.com
Monthly average wage: en.wikipedia.org
Leisure time per day: www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org
Internet users who bought online: ec.europa.eu
Online B2C: www.adigital.org
Media/entertainment purchases: www.consumerbarometer.com
Internet users who gambled online: ec.europa.eu
Fun Fact 1: files.gemius.pl