German

On this page you will find information (scroll down) about:

  1. the German language and the challenges of iGaming localisation.
  2. the German online gaming market, particularly regulation/legality of online gaming.

The German language and
the challenges of gaming localisation

Writing or translating a gaming text in German means BALANCE.

As always, also gaming translations take into account the audience you are addressing, the expectations of the end user and the cultural aspects governing the translation rules and theories even in a young and dynamic sector like games and sports translations. Especially for the German market it is crucial to maintain a formal tone with the use of the third person Sie instead of the more confidential Du.

the right balance between professionalism and a friendly attitude is of paramount importance

German business relationships are more formal than in other languages and require a particular balance between respect and confidentiality. In the gaming sector, where people are supposed to play with their money, and being games less formal than other sectors, the right balance between professionalism and a friendly attitude is of paramount importance. Imagine a stiff and old language used to introduce an ultramodern video slot machine… It would simply crash in an unbalanced manner, as there would be a grand inconstancy between the stiff introduction and the slot machine filled with funny pun expressions.

What is more is that language has to be perfectly correct. Grammar and style are the first values considered by a potential user when checking out a gaming website for the first time. Is the text fluent and does it sound natural? If yes, then the website is reliable and the player would be more inclined to spend some money with the aim of e.g. winning a jackpot.

Translating German iGaming material means caring about cultural sensitivity, linguistic aspects, marketing strategies, and legal aspects and last but not least it means being a player and knowing what a player needs and knows

Translating German iGaming material means caring about cultural sensitivity, linguistic aspects, marketing strategies, and legal aspects and last but not least it means being a player and knowing what a player needs and knows. This is why it is recommended not to abuse of English terms. The players might be aware of them but would feel more comfortable reading the German equivalents if these exist. On the other hand, well established Anglicism in the German gaming language are more than welcome and should be preferred to awkward sounding German inventions. Again, finding the balance is crucial.

And there’s more: you have the choice and the responsibility of offering the correct classic term or a term that’s widely used but not properly correct. An example is the use for SEO purposes of the term Casino (English version) instead of the “more” German solution Kasino. At All-In Translations we are always listening to our clients wishes and we encourage them to elaborate on their stylistic preferences where subjects like SEO is crucial. You can fill in these preferences here.

When it comes to Graphical User Interface (GUI) translations, it is fundamental to take the length of the target language into consideration. German is 30% longer than English and uses much more compound words which end up being too long for English-sized buttons and tables, and we always recommend post-editing. The consequence is that the translator is forced to translate with a shorter but not fitting synonym or to provide an abbreviated form which could be difficult to understand. An even better solution is in the hand of game developers who should be more aware of translation issues and plan an internationalization (I18N) before localization (L10N) to make sure all localized and translated versions work as the original.

This is why we always encourage our clients to contact us as early as possible in the process, so that we can provide them with our advice. Contact us now!


Status and potential of
the German gaming market

One might think that the German gaming market is saturated, as the E-commerce sector is one of the most mature of its kind in Europe, but German undoubtedly seem like a land of opportunity for online gaming operators.

And where lies the biggest potential? In mobile gaming, of course.

According to online-casino.de, the mobile gaming market in Germany is predicted to double from 2012/2013 to 2015, with an estimated online Gross Gambling Revenue of $23 billion in 2015. That means $333 per German adult.

the mobile gaming market in Germany is predicted to double from 2012/2013 to 2015

Reports show that 4% of German Internet users bet/gambled/played lotto online in 2011, but a drastic increase in Internet penetration and smartphone penetration is likely to have raised those numbers considerably by 2014. Germany is now the fastest growing E-commerce in Western Europe, with $67.7 billion in annual online B2C spend in 2013. 81 percent of Internet users bought online in that same year.

Online gambling (except horse racing) was banned in 2008, but the European Court of Justice stated in 2010 that the online gambling monopoly in Germany had to be liberalised. One German state, Schleswig-Holstein, has already adopted a more liberal policy, and and online casino operators have been able to apply for a license here since 2012. Let us know if you want some help to translate your online gaming application license into German, as this is one of our specialties in translation services.

Sprechen Sie Deutsch? Then you have something in common with All-In Translations. Contact us now to discuss how we can make your mobile games attractive to the German audience, or take a look at the profiles of our talented German translators, who allows us to offer an accurate, professional and service-minded German translation-localisation service emphasized on gaming.

Germany infographic
Some general notes about the data:
These infographics were made in May 2014, and the data used is as recent as we could find. We have tried to find sources with data for all or many countries, in order to increase the value of comparison, but obviously this is not always possible. We encourage users to check the sources below or to contact us for clarification.