Spanish (Mexican)

On this page you will find information (scroll down) about:

  1. The Mexican Spanish language and the challenges of iGaming localisation.
  2. The Mexican gaming market, particularly regulation/legality of online gaming.

The Mexican Spanish language and
the challenges of gaming localisation

As opposed to other Latin American countries, such as Argentina, the Mexican people tend to be quite formal and some even address their parents with a rather formal treatment as a sign of respect. This should not be overlooked when setting the parameters for translation and localisation of a website as it is fundamental to reach the right tone and register to address your target audience.

An interesting fact of Mexican Spanish is the vast influence it has received from its neighbour country, the United States. So much so, some Spanish words in Northern cities of Mexico are an adaptation of an English word into Spanish, therefore they are spelled in Spanish following how they sound in English (e.g., “Troca” which means and comes from “Truck”).

As the iGaming industry evolves, and the live casino and poker offerings grow, this aspect of translation gains prominence for applications using video/voice over features, where even local accents are also in the limelight. It is also important to note that localising an application or website for a specific country does not necessarily mean it will only be used by players in that very country as immigration waves expand and political borders get blurred.

the term “slot machines”, which in Spain is rendered as “tragaperras”, is in Mexico translated as “tragamonedas”

Although, nowadays there is a tendency to try to unify regional varieties of a language such as Spanish under a “hybrid” neutral Spanish, it can be argued that there is no such thing as a neutral language from the moment different countries use different words to call a single object, for example the translation of “slot machines” which in Spain is “tragaperras” and in México, “tragamonedas”.

It would probably be confusing to try to please every client under the same “umbrella language” as there would always be someone feeling left out and, at the end of the day, the translation would be a patchwork of terms instead of a consistent and meaningful piece of work that would appeal a specific target. That is why at All-in Translations we take pride in getting the right local linguist for the right job.


Status and potential of
the Mexican gaming market

Mexico is only second to Argentina as a potentially lucrative South American market. Mexico’s 1947 Federal Gaming and Raffles Law regulated gambling, and 2004 legislation allowed online gaming, with about 200 permits awarded in 2006, most of them to Apuestas Internacionales, a subsidiary of the Mexican TV giant Televisa.

The Mexican gaming market may be worth some US$4.6 billion. Until now the gaming business has been dominated by the government-run Nationa Lottery. Online gaming is expected to become one of the most lucrative niches of the business. 61% of internet users have made an online purchase, and the online B2C spend in 2013 was $1.2 billion.

In Mexico there are very few restrictions when it comes to advertising of online gaming

Through Mexican sites (ending in .mx), it is possible to access the international sites of the main betting operators. In Mexico there are very few restrictions when it comes to advertising of online gaming. Combined with the fact that the Mexican language is almost identical to other South American variants of Spanish, you can create marketing campaigns or websites that have the potential of reaching a massive audience with only a few adjustments.

At All-In Translations we play fair, and we would only charge you a fraction of our normal price to make these adjustments that would make the content feel like it was written by a native Mexican. Contact us if you would like to learn how we could help you break into the Mexican gaming market with our industry know-how and attractive Mexican gaming translations.

Mexico infographic
Some general notes about the data:
These infographics were made in May 2014, and the data used is as recent as we could find. We have tried to find sources with data for all or many countries, in order to increase the value of comparison, but obviously this is not always possible. We encourage users to check the sources below or to contact us for clarification.
Total population: Indexmundi.com
Internet penetration (%): Internetlivestats.com
Smartphone penetration (%): Think.withgoogle.com
#of facebook users: Internetworldstats.com
Monthly average wage: Wikipedia.org
Credit cards/person: Creditcards.com
Average hours of leisure time per day: Nationmaster.com
Average hours online per day: Slideshare.net
Total annual B2C online spend 2013: Onbile.com
Of people purchasing media and entertainment products/services, % used search engine: Consumerbarometer.com
Selling fact related to online purchases: Kpmg.com
One selling item of data related to online gambling: Calvinayre.com
Gross Gambling Revenue (GGR) $/ Casino Gaming Market: Pwc.com