eGaming Translation

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What does eGaming stand for? What is it? What has translation got to do with eGaming? And why does the term "eGaming" have to be spelled so awkwardly? These are probably not the questions you daydream about, but then again, it is probably not a coincidence that you ended up on the eGaming translation service page of All-In Translations.

We are including ‘eGaming translation’ as a service simply because it is a term which describes exactly our most important subject for translation, localization and content writing, the only difference being the way it is written. We prefer the term "iGaming" (or "online gaming"), but "eGaming" is also frequently used in the industry.

All-In Translations is the only translation company that specifically mentions online gaming as a speciality in the magazine called iGaming Business Marketplace 2013/2014.

To be completely honest, we are not 100% sure about the origins of this term. While the ‘i’ in iGaming stands for ‘Internet’, to the best of our knowledge, the ‘e’ in eGaming does not seem to have an abbreviating purpose. The only one we can think of is ‘electronic’, and that seems like a logical explanation.

eGaming and iGaming - is there a difference?

All-In Translations is the only translation company that specifically mentions online gaming as a speciality in the magazine called iGaming Business Marketplace 2013/2014. A competitor of this magazine is eGaming Review (also known as EGR magazine), and this magazine appears frequently when searching online for phrases related to eGaming.

However, eGaming is also a term used in more official circumstances. For instance, it is used in this report from KPMG from a summit in Gibraltar, and according to this article it seems like the whole online gaming sector on the Isle of Man is referred to as 'the e-Gaming sector'.

Is there a difference between electronic gaming and Internet gaming? The only plausible explanation we can come up with is that electronic gaming could refer to gaming which occurs electronically on a machine of some sort, but does not take place online, e.g. slot machines in "bricks & mortar" casinos. That does not, however, explain everything, since both EGR magazine and the e-gaming sector of the Isle of Man represent gaming that takes place in an online environment.

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Why is eGaming spelled so awkwardly?

At All-In Translations, we like to think of our writers and translators as creative souls. However, it would be difficult for us to get anything written without grammatical rules. In translation, the line between correct grammar on the one side, and a modern, attractive language on the other, is surprisingly thin.

This is the case particularly for eGaming translation, mainly because the industry moves faster than most others, but also because it is a newish subject with a relatively young audience. A factor to consider is also Search Engine Optimization (SEO), which can sometimes have a direct impact if it is prioritized over correct grammar. In the eGaming industry, it usually is.

So... where to draw the line? It hurts our translators' eyes to see a sentence starting with the word eGaming, and we are not particularly fond of hyphens either. Think about "e-Gaming". Is this a name? If not, why is it written like that? From our standpoint, it looks like it originated as a brand name, and gradually became a common term, and the spelling of the brand name stuck with the term as the phenomenon developed.

So how does All-In Translations deal with this?

Firstly, we send our clients a questionnaire in which we ask if they have particular preferences when it comes to spelling of particular terms, e.g. for SEO reasons. If you do not specify, we will make calculated guesses.

To showcase the fact that we have a better chance of making the right choice, I would like you to imagine a lottery: For every time our translators and our competitors were faced with a linguistic challenge directly related to eGaming, we would all get a ticket. Well, we are absolutely sure that no one would pile up more tickets in this lottery than us.

95% of our client base is directly related to the eGaming industry, and includes names like Tipico, Playtech, Everest Casino, Williams Interactive and many more.